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Lame Duck: Will Obama’s strike plan ‘fade’ after lack of support?

21st Century Wire says…
 
G20 members will not provide support for Obama’s military strike on Syria…

Obama’s attempt to convince world leaders to back his vague military plan for Syria has fallen flat, during a press conference this Friday in St. Petersburg, Russia, he appeared tired and deflated, backing away from a clear plan on Syria.

Organizing for America, a political action group for Obama, has reportedly been tasked with putting pressure on congress by mobilizing its million plus email subscribers to act on behalf of the president, however they been shut out by a massive campaign from American citizens to vote “no” on Syria.

Will the House vote on Syria when its been reported that 90% of Americans oppose another conflict?

The Daily Caller below…

Obama hints he may abandon Syria strike

Neil Munro
White House Correspondent
The Daily Caller

President Barack Obama hinted Friday that he might not strike Syria if Congress rejects his authorization request.

“I’m not itching for military action… and if there are good ideas that are worth pursuing, then I’m going to be open to them,” he told one reporter who asked if he was seeking alternatives to a missile strike.

“Are we on a fast track to military action as soon as Congress renders its judgment one way or the other?” the reporter asked Obama, during his morning press conference in St. Petersburg, Russia.

“Some in Congress have suggested giving the Syrian regime 45 days to sign the Chemical Weapons Convention, get rid of its chemical stockpiles, do something that would enhance the international sense of accountability for Syria, but delay military action,” the reporter asked.

“I am listening to all these ideas, and some of them are constructive,” he said.

“My goal is to maintain the international norm on banning chemical weapons. I want that enforcement to be real… I want people to understand that gassing innocent people, you know, delivering chemical weapons against children, is not something we do,” he said.

Through the press conference, Obama played down the prospect of a strike, whether by aircraft-launched guided bombs, or sea-launched missiles, such as the Tomahawk cruise missile.

“As I said last night, I was elected to end wars, not start them,” he said. “I’ve spent the last four and a half years doing everything I can to reduce our reliance on military power as a means of meeting our international obligations and protecting the American people.”

The Senate is likely to approve Obama’s request, but the House seems set to reject his request. Few Democrats or Republicans have voiced support for the measure, which is so unpopular that voters’ phone calls to offices in Congress are overwhelmingly reporting opposition.

Obama’s equivocations and rhetorical asides often provide guides to his intentions and decisions.

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