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A ‘Tug of War’ Over 3D Printed Hearts

21st Century Wire says…


It’s not hard to imagine how the advent of 3D printing technology will affect every aspect of our lives in the coming future world…

First it was printed guns, then drones and now a bioficial heart, it seems we’ll be able to print nearly anything that can be imagined, some suggest this is just one kind of technology that could lead to a singularity of humanity.

The term bioficial simply means that there is a merger between nature and artificial devices. Left unchecked, these devices and progressions could potentially cut us out of the picture entirely, leaving a world full of machines.

On the surface these kinds of developments have a mystical allure akin to those who are desperately chasing the GOD gene, however, this kind of future could be much closer to Phillip K. Dick’s – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, offering up a half humans and half robots for mortal consumption and integration in our everyday lives.

Already we’ve seen advancements in artificial intelligence once seen as fantasy, as there has been a rise in military war machines created for combat.

Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 11.49.16 PM

Joe Dyer
, Managing Director of iRobot, a  military contractor based in Boston, refers to their robot creations as ‘children’ (see photo, above).

More from RT…

Bioengineers promise to 3D-print human hearts in a decade


Russia Today

Scientists in Kentucky predict that they’ll be able to use 3D printer technology to create a bioficial human heart in only ten years’ time.

Dr. Stuart Williams is the director of the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute in downtown Louisville, Kentucky, and he thinks his office is only a decade away from what could be one of the biggest medical marvels ever.

Heart disease is the number one killer in the United States and claims around 1 million lives annually, according to recent studies. Dr. Williams has witnessed both of his parents pass away due to the disease, and by 2020 it is expected to be the biggest life-taker on Earth. By then, however, Williams expects to be near the breakthrough point with regards to his most ambitious endeavor yet.

America put a man on the Moon in less than a decade. I said a full decade to provide some wiggle room,” Williams recently told Wired of his projected progress.

Just as 3D printers have let anyone from hobbyists to industrial designers manufacture objects as of late, Williams says he wants to use that same technology to replicate the most critical of body parts. Designers have already managed to show that 3D printers are capable of churning out fully-functioning firearms, and scientists have already explored with making organs, including a liver and anear, with that technology. Williams, however, wants to be able to bring to life something with a beat.

We think we can do it in 10 years — that we can build, from a patient’s own cells, a total ‘bioficial’ heart,” he said to the Courier Journal newspaper.

Speaking to local network WDRB, Williams said, “The term total bioficial heart really started here in Louisville.” In 2007 Williams joined the rank of the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute, a joint collaboration between the city’s Jewish Hospital and the University of Louisville, and once there he patented the first method in the world for using fat-derived stem cells for therapeutic use. He’s again exploring what exactly cells are capable of, and could be onto something huge.

“You take tissue from a patient isolate the cells, because we’re all made up of just billions and billions of cells put those cells into a machine, hit a button and it will print out a heart,” he told the station. “Fifty CCs of fat is two golf ball size pieces of fat and there are enough cells in that fat to rebuild basically all of the major blood vessels in the heart.”

If you think about building an airplane what you do is build individual parts and then assemble… We’re doing the exact same thing with the bioficial heart,” he added to WDRB…

Read more at RT

SEE MORE 3-D PRINTING AT: 21st Century Wire Sci-Tech